state of arizona

Arizona, the Grand Canyon State

Cut into the high plateau of northern Arizona, a mile deep and over 200 miles long, is the awesome Grand Canyon of the Colorado River. The Petrified Forest and the Painted Desert are other geologic marvels that were part of this land when prehistoric peoples lived in the almost inaccessible cliff dwellings that still exist. Later came Spanish conquistadores. But it was not until Americans came that the Arizona desert was transformed into a prosperous, growing land.

state of arizona

Discovery of rich copper deposits brought the first settlers to Arizona in the nineteenth century; the successful use of irrigation and the attractive climate brought many more in the twentieth. Dams built on the Colorado, Salt and Cila rivers provided water for the fertile valleys in the south; and farms, cattle ranches and towns sprang up. Today irrigated farms grow melons, citrus, vegetables and cotton. Mining remains important to Arizona: the State produces lead, zinc, silver, gold and uranium and leads the nation in the production of copper.

state of arizona

American pioneers came to a land dominated by Indians, especially the Apaches, who, until 1886, threatened the peace of the Territory. Arizona now has the largest Indian population of any State, with thirteen tribes, including the Pima, Papago, Apache, Hopi, and Navajo-the largest tribe in the nation. Within its boundaries are more than half of all Indian lands in the U.S.

state of arizona

The State’s principal cities, Phoenix, the capital, and Tucson, have grown rapidly since World War II. For decades they have attracted tourists and those seeking a dry climate; in addition, these cities have become industrial centers with major electronics and airplane plants. With more sunshine than any other State, Arizona has a climate that rivals its natural Wonders, one of the reasons it has become one of the fastest growing States in the Union.

state of arizona

It’s all about the 50 States of America.