state of arkansas

Arkansas, the Land of Opportunity

Arkansas has unique riches in-and below-its soil. In addition to extensive forests, Arkansas grows almost every crop produced in the U.S., and its mineral deposits-besides oil, gas and coal-include the nation’s prime source of aluminum ore and the only diamond mine in North America. Arkansas is almost evenly divided between the lowlands along the Mississippi and the rugged mountains in the west. Early in the nineteenth century, cotton planters moved into the rich lowlands, and cotton remains one of the principal crops, along with rice, corn and soybeans. For years, lumbering has been a leading industry: approximately one quarter of the State is covered with timber. Equally important are the cattle, hogs, and chickens raised in the high plateau in the northwest.

state of arkansas

Although agriculture has long dominated Arkansas’s economy, the Sixties saw manufacturing take first place. Today plants in the State make products from paper cups to cement, from shirts to rubber tires.

state of arkansas

Arkansas’s mineral resources were first exploited by the Indians. Years before the white man came, Indians were working the novaculite deposits near Malvern and Hot Springs, getting this hard, fine-grained stone for arrow heads, spear points, and knives. The State is still a prime source of novaculite, used now principally for whetstones. And from the town of Bauxite, which gave its name to aluminum ore, comes 95 per cent of that ore produced in the U.S. Most of Arkansas’s oil fields are along its southern border, and the continent’s only diamond mine is near Murfreesboro.

state of arkansas

Arkansas has an abundance of lakes, streams and forests, including Ouachita and Ozark national forests. Famous health resorts are located at the State’s exceptional natural springs; the most celebrated: Hot Springs.

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